What to Do This Week in LA, Miami, and NYC

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Oktoberfest is so ovah. This week, in New York City, go see Bill Murray live getting in cahoots with a classical musician. Miami way, it may not be alternative, but it sure will be rewarding to go catch Bruno Mars. And in Los Angeles, get all unraveled at LACMA while seeing a classic black-and-white horror movie, The Mummy. That’s a wrap.

NEW YORK CITY

Anything but same-old Groundhog Day, this Monday evening, go see an unlikely-buddy duo at the Carnegie Hall’s Stern Auditorium, where the actor/man-about-town Bill Murray and the estimable German cellist Jan Vogler collaborate in a hodgepodge of music, literature, and storytelling entitled New Worlds. What we know is that there will be live music from Gershwin, Bernstein, Henry Mancini, and Van Morrison, as well as readings from Whitman and Twain. To us it sounds as spontaneous as Murray himself.

MIAMI

When you think of Bruno Mars, you picture him on TV performing at nearly every ubiquitous music awards ceremony there is. A bit too glitz. But as a live performer, on regional stages, the handsome devil charms like nearly every other musician but for, say, Justin Timberlake. In a world of cynicism there is something earnest and enthralling about this Hawaiian-born vocalist who has earned his pop king status. Go Wednesday night to the American Airlines Arena, where vocalist Jorja Smith is opening for him. Tickets range from $75 to $175. They’ll go fast.

LOS ANGELES 

Play hooky Tuesday and get your pre-Halloween on in a sophisticated space, LACMA, to see The Mummy, the now-iconic, black-and-white 1932-released horror film, starring Boris Karloff, at a one-day-only matinee at 1 p.m. for just $4. The movie is both haunting and romantic, the makeup effects above the F/X we see today, more real. The undead will do that to a guy.

Film still courtesy of The Mummy

Steve Garbarino

Steve Garbarino

Steve Garbarino is a contributing editor at Vanity Fair and a culture reporter for The Wall Street Journal. He is also the author of "A Fitzgerald Companion."

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